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We are in support of  S04057-A & A6773-A
an amendment to the Security Guard Act

This bill passed the senate but failed to get out of the Assembly Codes committee.
We will continue to lobby this bill.

This amendment will remove the requirement that a peace officer must be employed full time as a peace officer to qualify for a training waiver.

General Business
Article 7-A - SECURITY GUARD ACT

§  89-f. Definitions. As used in this article, the following words and phrases shall have the following meanings:

14.  "Peace  officer"  shall  mean  a  peace  officer  as  defined  by subdivision  thirty-three of section 1.20 of the criminal procedure law, who is employed [full-time] as a peace officer and  who  has  successfully completed  the  training requirements as set forth in subdivision one of section 2.30 of such law.

The requirement to be employed full time as a peace officer dates back to when the training for part time peace officers was different from full time peace officers. In 2009 the Division of Criminal Justice Services  & NYSAAP lobby S6102-a & A7957-a. One of the arguments used was "The bill also eliminates the limitation on part-time peace officer training. Peace officers possess the same powers and are responsible for the same duties regardless of whether they are employed full-time or part-time. There is no logical reason to provide a peace officer with reduced training merely because he or she works less than 40 hours per week. "

Training for Peace Officers is now the same for all peace officers and is found in the criminal procedure law subdivision one of section 2.30.

Auxiliary Police are registered and trained as peace officers, but as volunteers are not considered full time employees, if fact some auxiliary police officers have more training then some of the full time peace officers that can receive a training waiver for security guard.

This amendment will have no fiscal impact on any government.

See our
Memorandum of Support

 


We are working on an amendment to the CPL
We need bill sponsors
We met with the leaders of the Senate & Assembly Codes Committees on 4/22/13 and asked for their help in getting this bill written and passed.

Click here to see the amendment
 

Our amendment will allow the employer (police department, Sheriff's Department, etc.) to give these officers limited Non-Civil Defense duties such as patrol.
The amendment would recognize Auxiliary Police as Peace Officers in the event they were assaulted or killed while on duty.
And, our amendment will allow the employer to train and authorized the officers to carry defensive weapons such as the expandable baton or OC spray while on duty.   


Please see http://www.auxiliary-police.org/articles.htm for related news articles.

 

WHY WE NEED NEW LEGISLATION TO AMEND THE CPL 2.10 PARAGRAPH 26

1. The Auxiliary Police, or Special Deputy Sheriffs, are required under The Civil Defense Act of 1951 which states under Article 3 § 22 that every county, except those contained in the city of New York, and every city shall… Recruit, equip and train auxiliary police or special deputy sheriffs in sufficient number to maintain order and control traffic in the event of an attack and to perform such other police and emergency civil defense functions as may be required during and subsequent to attack. During that time, they were used to direct traffic to the air raid shelters and to control the people at those shelters. This is NOT what we are used for today. The duties and activities of auxiliary police vary considerably. In upstate communities, auxiliary police direct traffic at parades, fairs, special events and church crossings. They check vacation homes, participate in emergency rescues and searches for missing persons, ride as second man in patrol cars and perform administrative work for police departments. Downstate, and in larger cities, auxiliary police patrol trains, subway platforms and bus terminals. They perform neighborhood watches and patrols and assist police in crowd control. Auxiliary police educate the public in crime prevention techniques, engrave valuable property with the owner’s driver’s license or I.D. number, patrol the streets and report illegal activities to the appropriate law enforcement agency. They check doors and windows to make sure they are locked and that no one has or can gain entry illegally, and patrol in squad cars in an effort to reduce vandalism. These activities, although very important, are not covered by The Civil Defense Act of 1950 or by the CPL. Some Counties & Cities have feared the liability so much, that they disbanded their Auxiliary Police Programs in the late 1980’s.

2. The Auxiliary Police are only considered Limited Peace Officers during a declared emergency or authorized drill. Case law in the 1980's put to question "what is an authorized drill?" It is imperative, however, that the Auxiliary Police have the same statuary protection of being a Peace Officer while on duty that other unformed services have. Auxiliary Police officers drive cars that resemble Police Cars & wear similar uniforms, but many do not have the same protective equipment a police officer would have to protect himself.

3. In many instances, the Auxiliary Police are put in harms way and considering today’s problems with Homeland Security, it is imperative that we get our communities involved in the safety of their homes.

4. Lastly, and in all due respect, it is almost ludicrous to expect a viable and modern force existing today and providing tremendous aid to the various communities in which they serve, to work under the jurisdiction of a law created prior to 1950.


AN  ACT  to  amend  the  public  officers  law, in relation to residency
          requirements for certain positions

S1122 & A6116

This bill passed both houses after some changes were made.
It was signed in to law on 7/12/13.
To see the changes, click on one of the bill numbers above.


SUMMARY OF PROVISIONS:  Section one amends section 3-b of the public
officers law by adding a new subdivision 5, providing that persons
employed or appointed as an auxiliary police officer or a special deputy
sheriff need not be a resident of the political subdivision or municipal
corporation that employed or appointed such person.
 
Section two is the effective date.
 
 
JUSTIFICATION: This legislation would provide more flexibility for
local governments in the employment or appointment of certain peace
officers, specifically auxiliary police officers and special deputy
sheriffs. Under current law, certain local governments are required to
have auxiliary police or special deputy sheriffs to perform emergency
civil defense functions. Auxiliary police are volunteers.  Because of
the difficult economic times across our state, many local governments
are experiencing difficulty in recruiting and retaining auxiliary police
and special deputy sheriffs. Allowing local governments to accept these
officers from neighboring counties will help resolve this problem.
 
 
LEGISLATIVE HISTORY: New Bill.
 
 
FISCAL IMPLICATIONS: None.
 
 
EFFECTIVE DATE: This act shall take effect immediately.


Relates to creating volunteer peace officers' benefits in the
event of injuries or death in the line of duty

S01113

This bill has no Assembly sponsor at this time.
It is in the Senate Finance Committee.
This bill is based on the Volunteer Ambulance Workers' Law


Amd S837, Exec L; add S206-c, Gen Muni L
Establishes Chapter 64-c of the consolidated laws in relation to creating the volunteer peace officers' benefit law; provides volunteer peace officers' benefits in the event of injuries or death in the line of duty; relates to volunteer peace officer programs.

PURPOSE:
To consolidate and streamline the statute dealing with auxiliary police, also to create an auxiliary police benefit law.
 
 
SUMMARY OF PROVISIONS:
Various sections seek to codify the existence of auxiliary police, while creating a benefit for them based on that given to volunteer fireman and ambulance workers.
 
 
JUSTIFICATION:
This legislation is vastly important to:
 1) Consolidate uniformed volunteer members of law enforcement agencies within the State of New York, including but not limited to Auxiliary Police, Special Deputy Sheriffs. Reserve Sheriffs/Police, Special Police, Reserve Police, SPCA, SPCC, Search and Rescue Squads, and Public safety Emergency Officers;
2)Establish legal authority for law-enforcement agencies to conduct volunteer law enforcement operations;
3) Establish legal authority for volunteer officers to perform their duties;
4) Establish recruiting standards;
5) Increase minimal training standards;
6) Provide deserved benefits;
7) Protect uniformed volunteers in law enforcement agencies;
and
8) Protect law enforcement agencies from liability lawsuits due to lack of workers compensation coverage. Passage of this legislation will legalize existing volunteer officers and operations as well as help recruit and retain current members.
 
 
AUTHORITY
The establishment of Auxiliary Police or Special Deputy Sheriffs was mandated by the New York State Defense Emergency Act of 1951. At that time, auxiliary police were organized and empowered to direct vehicular traffic to air raid shelters and to perform crowd control functions at those shelters in the event of a nuclear attack CPL 2,10(26) provides the authority for auxiliary police to direct and control traffic during a period of attack or imminent attack by enemy forces or during "official drills".
 
 
PROBLEM
With the cold war over and changing needs, all Auxiliary Police units are extensively utilized by law enforcement agencies for many activities which are far outside of the original intent and scope of the Act and authority granted by CPL 2.10(26). Auxiliary police officers volunteer their time to perform these assigned duties at substantial personal risk. When performing duties without legal authority, auxiliary police officers do not have workers compensation protection for medical treatment, lost wages and are exposed to personal liability. In fact, seriously injured auxiliary police officers have found themselves without compensation and an auxiliary police officer was found to be personally liable for a car accident while driving a marked auxiliary police car
(see Fitzgibbon, infra).
 
Without proper legal authority for auxiliary police officers to perform routine duties,. the law enforcement agencies they work for are vulnerable to lawsuits for injuries sustained Under the workers compensation law, when employees are covered by workers compensation' their employers cannot be liable for injuries sustained on the job because auxiliary police officers do not have workers compensation insurance, they can maintain liability actions against the agencies for whom they work Providing legal authority to auxiliary police officers will provide them with workers compensation coverage and also protect the law enforcement agencies for whom they work.
 
 
AUTHORIZED ACTIVITIES
Other than attack or imminent attack by enemy forces, only official drills can be authorized. An official drill is a "single-event" training exercise to be performed on a specific date. A request for authorization to perform a training exercise at an event must be requested of the state by the law-enforcement agency in writing prior to the date at the event.
 
 
UNAUTHORIZED ACTIVITIES
Because it is usually impractical to request authorization to conduct an official drill in advance of events and the time needed to fill out requests, blanket requests covering a period of time such as one year are sometimes filed by police departments. Blanket requests, to "drill" over a broad period of time are not authorized and no benefits or protections will be afforded to auxiliary police officers performing under a blanket request. An example of a drill which can qualify as an authorized official drill, under the proper circumstances, is traffic control and/or crowd control at a particular scheduled event.
 
Official drills are not contemplated by the Act to include routine or daily functions, which comprise 99% of assigned auxiliary police duties. In fact, in David Fitzgibbon, Jr., Plaintiff-Respondent v the County of Nassau, the Auxiliary Police Unit 316, et al, Appellants-Respondents, the Supreme Court of the State of New York Appellate Division, Second Department, ruled that routine patrols were not contemplated by the Act and held the auxiliary police officer and his auxiliary police unit liable for injuries caused.
 
 
UNAUTHORIZED DUTIES PERFORMED
The duties and activities of auxiliary police vary considerably, depending upon the needs of the police department, and usually include monthly minimum hourly requirements for performing routine patrols and traffic control at details, none of which is authorized by the state. Failure to meet the minimum hourly requirements will result in termination of the auxiliary police officer. Virtually all auxiliary police activities are outside of the scope of the Act and the CPL, placing volunteer officers at great personal risk, liability, and without workers compensation protection for medical coverage, pharmaceutical bills, household help,
lost wages and other benefits. Duties which are not authorized official drills, outside the scope of the Act and commonly assigned on a routine daily basis by law enforcement agencies to auxiliary police consist of the following:
1) Directing traffic at accidents, inoperable traffic lights, power outages, parades, fairs, religious and most special events;
2) Assisting police with crowd control at school, religious and most special events;
3) Nightly patrols in squad cars to find and report crime and accidents to supervising law enforcement agencies, as a deterrent to crime by maintaining a visible
public presence, and to observe, detect and report suspicious activity and possible terrorism;
4) Issuing complaints for handicap parking violations;
5) Providing additional eyes for police officers at traffic stops; and
6) Assisting in locating missing persons.
Additional unauthorized duties assigned by some police departments may include:
Searches for missing persons; Emergency rescues; Riding as second man in patrol cars; Performing administrative work for police, departments; Patrolling trains, subway platforms and bus terminals; and assisting with animal humane law enforcement.
 
Although these assigned duties are important to police departments, they are being performed without any authority of law. Due to fear of liability, some counties and cities have disbanded their Auxiliary Police Programs, in the late 1970's, despite the mandate of the Act.
 
Auxiliary Police officers drive patrol cars that resemble police Cars and wear similar uniforms carrying a nightstick and handcuffs (some auxiliary departments carry guns), but many do not have the same protective equipment a police officer would have to protect himself.  To recruit new members and retain current members, it is imperative that law enforcement agencies receive sufficient funds to purchase protective equipment for volunteer members and that while on duty Auxiliary Police
Officers have the same statutory protection of a Peace Officer that other unformed services have.
 
 

 
PARITY
Auxiliary police DO NOT have a Benevolent Law like The Volunteer Firefighters' Benefit Law and the Volunteer Ambulance Workers' Benefit Law which provide real estate tax credits, a service award program, and workers compensation benefits for medical care, lost wages, and other benefits to volunteer members who are injured or become ill in the line of duty. Recognizing the unselfish service of volunteer firefighters and volunteer ambulance workers, laws designed to protect such volunteers who are injured or become ill in the line of duty, were enacted in 1957 and 1989, respectively. Auxiliary police volunteers deserve the SAME
protection those volunteers receive including real estate tax credits, a service award program, and workers compensation benefits.
 
This new legislation would help to create proposed minimum standards with which all units would need to comply in order to reap the benefits that will, hopefully, be gained with this legislation The benefits can act as incentive for the various forces to voluntarily comply with the proposed minimum standards.
 
It is unreasonable to expect a viable and modem volunteer force existing today and providing tremendous aid to the various communities in which they serve, to work without reasonable benefits in dangerous conditions and without legal authority under the guise of a law that came about in 1950 and did not foresee current needs.
 
 
LEGISLATIVE HISTORY:
S.5624A of 2008
 
 
FISCAL IMPLICATIONS:
None.
 
 
EFFECTIVE DATE:
This act shall take effect on the first of April next succeeding the
date it becomes law.

This legislation is vastly important to:

   1) Consolidate uniformed volunteer members of law enforcement agencies within the State of New York, including but not limited to Auxiliary Police, Special Deputy Sheriffs, Reserve Sheriffs/Police, Special Police, Reserve Police, SPCA, SPCC, Search and Rescue Squads, and Public Safety Emergency Officers.
   2) Establish legal authority for law-enforcement agencies to conduct volunteer law enforcement operations.
   3) Establish legal authority for volunteer officers to perform their duties.
   4) Establish recruiting standards.
   5) Increase minimal training standards.
   6) Provide deserved benefits.
   7) Protect uniformed volunteers in law enforcement agencies. and
   8) Protect law enforcement agencies from liability lawsuits due to lack of workers compensation coverage.

  Passage of this legislation will legalize existing volunteer officers and operations as well as help recruit and retain current members.

See this Article about the legal arguments for this Legislation http://www.hurt911.org/articles/auxiliary_police_liability.html

See this Article to see what the benefits are
http://www.auxiliary-police.org/vpobenefits.htm


Get a copy of the bill Click Here

Click Here to see a Resolution from Seneca County in support of this bill.

Click Here to see a Memorandum of Support from NYSAAP

Click Here to see a Memorandum of Support from RPOA

Click here to see a Letter of Support from APSBA

Click here to see a Letter of Support from the Nassau County Auxiliary Police.

We need more of these from Villages, Towns, Cities, & Counties in NY State.
If you belong to a civic association, we need a letter of support.

I am asking everyone to write to their State Senator, State Assembly Member & The Governor to urge the passage of these bills.
To find out who your State Senator and State Assembly Member are go to
 https://voterlookup.elections.state.ny.us/votersearch.aspx
This site will help you find your State Senate & Assembly district numbers.
Then use the information to look up your elected officials on the list at
http://www.elections.ny.gov:8080/reports/rwservlet?cmdkey=nysboe_incumbnt

To Write To The Governor:
Andrew Cuomo
Executive Chambers
State Capitol
Albany, NY 12224

We also support the following Legislation:

A2226 Grants additional credit of five points to auxiliary police officers in competitive examinations. This bill Grants additional credit of five points to auxiliary police officers in competitive examinations for original appointment or promotion to a civil service position with the city, town or village of his residence. Volunteer Firefighters & Volunteer Ambulance Workers already have this and if S01113 passed we would have already had this too.

Note: This bill does not have a "Same As" bill in the Senate at this time. It also lacks support in the Assembly Governmental Employees Committee due to pressure from the NYS Association of PBAs.


See our Memorandum of Support

A4712 Establishes a no fare program for transportation on the NYCTA, LIRR and MNCRC for duly enrolled members of the auxiliary police.

Note: This bill does not have a "Same As" bill in the Senate at this time. Also the sponsor of this bill is a member of the minority which can make it difficult to get passed.

A4734 Relates to qualifications for appointment to membership in the police force of the city of New York by certain New York city auxiliary police officers.

Note: This bill does not have a "Same As" bill in the Senate at this time.

A4295  Establishes a real property tax exemption for enrolled members of auxiliary police organizations.

Note: This bill does not have a "Same As" bill in the Senate at this time. Also the sponsor of this bill is a member of the minority which can make it difficult to get passed.

A5004 Provides access to information on persons applying to be an auxiliary police officer.

Note: This bill does not have a "Same As" bill in the Senate at this time.

We are opposed to the following Legislation:

A2772 Authorizes N.Y. police commissioner to promulgate rules and regulations directing uniforms of auxiliary police officer differ from those of the regular police force.

Note: This bill does not have a "Same As" bill in the Senate at this time.

See our Memorandum in Opposition